Monday, November 12, 2012

EDSS 521 Blog #4 - Project Tomorrow

The report I looked at was regarding the use of smart phones. From 2006 to 2011 parents of school aged children have seen a 3x increase in smartphones. From this time period, teachers have used smart phones 2x more. And 87% of parents say effective implementation of smart phones in education is important to their child's success. These figures did not surprise me, because it seems everyone has a smart phone now. I am just not as optimistic in their usage in the classroom, because kids can get off task too easily and we can't possibly enforce all students staying on task.

2 comments:

  1. Hey Woodie,

    The use of smart phones seems to be in large debate these days. Although I agree that finding a way to use them would be nice, since they are available and kids are living in an age where digital tools like the smart phone are available. I also agree with you that kids today, as they were long ago, are easily distracted. When hearing about how kids would be better suited to complete their work and be engaged I believe that they would ultimately want them for social networking or other uses. The other concern I would have is that not all students have a smart phone, some do not even have a phone, so it becomes an equality issue as well. Only time will tell how all this new technology will eventually be used within the class and if it is beneficial.

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  2. Hello Woodrow,

    I agree with the idea that "kids can get off task too easily and we can't possibly enforce all students staying on task" with the use of smart phones in class. I do think that if we allow the students the freedom to use them, they might be surprisingly respectful of the guidelines. We should give them the responsibility to choose to use them appropriately and if they choose to be unwise, then they will suffer the consequence (whatever that might be). I think that the students are going to try to use their phones anyways, like hiding it in their backpack or under their desk, so why not take the variable of being sneaky out of the equation and put it out there "on the table".

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